Editorial 9: Anonyme

Nous avons choisi le theme “anonyme” pour ce neuvième numéro de NMP. L’anonymat nous semble un concept exceptionellement important pour l’art, pour l’internet, et pour nos modes de vie clandestins. Nous explorons le concept de l’anonymat à travers ces trois univers.

For some reason, this theme inspired many to delve into a much more private type of exploration and writing style.


Anonymous as in:
Having an unknown or unacknowledged name: an anonymous author.

Originally we wanted to get contributors to submit to this issue anonymously, but we tossed out that idea when we realized that it would mean you would never know the amazing artists and writers in this issue. You should know their names, reference them, put them in your syllabus, curate them, make them rich and famous.


Anonyme, dont on ne connaît pas l’auteur.
Dénué de personnalité.
Dont on ne connaît pas le nom.

Incognito.

Les photos de 2Fik démontrent qu’une multiplicité d’identités conduit à l’anonymat plutôt qu’à une connaissance plus précise de soi. 2Fik est le photographe de Arabesque, couverture de NMP no. 9.

Anonymous as in:
Having an unknown or withheld authorship or agency.
An anonymous letter. An anonymous phone call…

Erin McGregor’s secret swap project, Nicholas Little’s pairing with random strangers through Chatroullette, and Damien Luxe’s CL adventures tell us a thing or two about anonymity and the internet. And how the private trickles down and out…

Kim Sheppard’s recycling of Internet culture meets McGregor’s urge to purge in the revelation of an “unnamed collective”, slowly piecing together online intimacies that divulge and disrupt the boundaries of the private and the public. As Lauren Howes illustrates, Sheppard harnesses online culture to question the notion of anonymity within a culture of ubiquitous self-reflection and self-recording. Sheppard’s work is sponsored by, CFMDC, the Canadian Filmmakers Distribution Centre – Thank you!

Parallèlement, dans son exploration des sites de rencontre fétichistes, Gonzague Gauthier questionne aussi le jeu entre le privé et le public – l’anonymat dépend-t-il d’une sphère publique ?

Three authors explore the scene in Toronto. Erin Silver explores the aesthetics of queer in search of the perpetually transgressive moment, teaching us all to look a little more queerly, in and out of the gallery space. Leila P interviews one of Toronto’s most prolific producers and promoter of queer culture, Will Munro. They talk about Egyptian iconography, magic, and a certain queer punk scene. Mark Clintberg plays with the concept of intimacy and its limits in public, when dealing with the uncertainties of love and friendship.

Dans T’es une p’tite qui ? Maude Gauthier explore le sens de l’adoption et la définition de la famille par rapport à la citoyenneté et la visibilité.

Check out yet another beautiful The Illustrated Gentleman from Elisha Lim’s second series. You can pre-order her book from the first series, 100 Butches Vol. 1 from Amazon for only CDN$ 16.75!

And be sure to test your trivia knowledge with Megan Morman’s crossword puzzle!

You can buy a beautiful full-colour perfect bound hard copy of NMP’s past issues at Lulu.com, or download the PDF for a few dollars.

Thanks again to everyone who helped copy edit and assemble this issue and – comme toujours – big love to m-c MacPhee and Dayna McLeod, curators and editors extraordinaire.

Thank you to Allyson Mitchell and to the Art Gallery of York University (AGYU) for all the support!

Check in again in July-August 2010 for our first guest editor, Mariko Tamaki’s, special issue. You won’t be sorry…

I’ve said it before and I will say it again, it’s great to see so many of you comment on the various articles – contributors love it. Dear readers, we are still and always committed to bringing forward a shadowy and secretive magazine bimonthly.


Mél Hogan