Editorial 8: Beast

Welcome to the 8th issue of NMP, theme: BEAST. In case you missed no. 7 WOUND, worry not, it is available to you here for free as we do and will do with the first issue of each new year. You can also buy a hard copy or the PDF. And if that wasn’t enough, it is also available for you now to flip through in 3D style! Astounding!

So, the theme of this issue is BEAST.

Beast as in:
an animal other than human, the wild side of the animal.

Bête:
personne dominée par ses instincts.

I had the pleasure and privilege of interviewing Jane Siberry a few months ago when she performed in Montréal. What I discovered after my time with Siberry is that we could all learn a thing or two from tapping into our inner beasts, which, while unruly at times, think and act for themselves.

As always, NMP’s regular contributors Nicholas Little and Elisha Lim really deliver.

Au tournant du siècle, un groupe d’artistes a tant choqué le public avec leurs œuvres d’art qu’ils ont été appelés “wild beasts” ou “fauves”, en français. Avec un style très émouvant, cru, et même choquant et violent, les artistes ont souvent opté pour des couleurs, des lignes et des formes exprimant l’émotion plutôt que de représenter le monde réel.

Voir: Valérie Sury. Illustrators abound this issue, see also Daryl Vocat and Elisha Lim.

Beast as in:
animal nature as opposed to intellect or spirit.

Dayna McLeod interviews Simone Jones about her epic installation work inspired by first-draft flying machines and early mechanical inventions. McLeod also writes about the work of cover photographer Elinor Whidden, who recently had a show at Gallery 44 in Toronto with collaborative duo, 12 Point Buck. This essay was commissioned and first published by Gallery 44 in the publication Natural Artifice. This cover is so beautiful, it brings me right back to the open furrows…

Visual and sonic artist Reena Katz offers herself in digital portraits as the illegitimate offspring of Zionist tendencies in an integrated circuit of ethnicity, nationalism and violence through her most feared alter egos.

Yasmin Nair argues that neoliberalism is structured around an affective relationship between humans and animals. According to Nair, capitalism in its current form would have us believe that advances in increased communications between humans and animals and more compassionate methods of care and slaughter also advance the reach and survival of the “natural world”.

Lindsay Shane explores the intimacy of isolation and the effects of the landscape in her fictional piece, “Core Samples”.

Nelson Henricks interviews photographer Shari Hatt’s dog, Garry-Lewis James Osterberg, formerly known as “Chico”, about his soft sculpture work and obsession with Iggy Pop.

Beast as in:
A brutal, contemptible, cruel, coarse, filthy, or uncivilized creature.
Savage nature or characteristics: the beast in wo/man [Latin bestia]

Bêtes noires:
Personne ou chose que l’on abhorre et redoute.

In an interview, Nikki Forrest lets us in, into the depth of her artist-as-beast, to where inspiration meets terror. Be sure to check out the beautiful collection of drawings/photographs included with the interview – amazing!

Thanks again to everyone who helped assemble this issue and big, big, love to m-c MacPhee and Dayna McLeod, curators extraordinaire.

It’s great to see so many of you comment on the various articles—keep on doing that—contributors are always appreciative of this. Dear readers, we are still and always committed to bringing forward an untamed and feral magazine bimonthly.

Mél Hogan

With the help of M-C MacPhee + Dayna McLeod